Quick Ways To Shake Writer's Block

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There’s a blank screen in front of you. The clock is ticking. And yet the words just won’t come.

You know the perfect words are in there somewhere, but that evil, ill-timed little scamp called writer’s block has you in a headlock. And it’s not letting go.

Do you?
A. Keep hitting your head against the wall and hope it’ll go away. Or,
B. Shake (shake, shake) it off T-Swift style.

Oh you clever thing, of course you’re going for B. So to help, here are some simple and silly ideas to help beat your writer’s block and get your writing mojo back where it belongs.

Because you know what’s definitely not happening in 2016? Letting writer’s block grind you down.

  1. Get to the good bit. Forget starting at the beginning. Write the part that excites you most and work backwards from there.
  2. Do the most boring thing you can – there’s nothing like a mundane round of washing dishes to help get your creative juices flowing. Bonus: your house will be all shiny and clean.
  3. Have a 10-minute dance party. Enough said.
  4. Get inspired by the greats. Read a page of your favourite book, spend some time on your favourite inspiring blog, or just read something completely different. Don’t copy – just let yourself get inspired with a bit of  word porn.
  5. Write something completely different. Trying to write an editorial piece? Writing a key scene in your book? Try turning your favourite fairy tale into a news article. Then go back to your original work feeling like a badass.
  6. Tick off the rest of your to-do list. Get away from your desk and take ten minutes to blitz through some of the easier tasks.
  7. Change your scenery. Oldest trick in the book, but it works a treat. Go for a quick walk (even just round the office), make a drink or write at a coffee shop, whatever you can to change things up.
  8. Put pen to paper. If you’re used to typing on a laptop, try an old fashioned brainstorm with a notebook. Brownie points if you use some ridiculously pretty stationery.
  9. Pretend you’ve already finished. Imagine you’ve already written your article, book or blog post, and visualise everyone loving it. How would they describe? And then just write it without any of the fear. There’s nothing stopping you.
  10. Know what to say but can’t find the words? Tell a friend (or an imaginary one). Explain what you’re trying to write and then write that bit down – exactly as you describe it. It’ll be more natural and they might even help you brainstorm.

Any others? Let’s hear ‘em.